Unexpectedly Intriguing!
October 31, 2005

Leave it to the statisticians of the U.S. Census for being able to come up with the following statistics related to Halloween in the U.S.:

36.4 million

The estimated number of potential "trick-or-treaters" — 5 to 13-year-olds - across the United States in 2004, a decline of 381,000 from 2003. Of course, many other "kids" - older than 13, and younger than 5 - also go "trick-or-treating."


Number of states that, contrary to the national trend, experienced an increase in their elementary school-age population (children between 5 and 13) between 2003 and 2004. Arizona (8,400), Nevada (7,500) and Florida (7,100) led the way, with North Carolina, Colorado and Georgia rounding out the list.

In 2004, Utah had the highest proportion of its total population in the 5-to-13 age group (14.9 percent), followed by Alaska (14.1 percent).

106 million
Number of potential stops for "trick-or-treaters," i.e., housing units occupied year-round.
998 million pounds
Total pumpkin production of major pumpkin-producing states in 2004. Illinois, with a production of 457 million pounds, led the country. Pumpkin patches in California, Ohio, Michigan, Pennsylvania and New York also produced a lot of pumpkins: each state produced at least 70 million pounds worth. The value of all the pumpkins produced by these states was $100 million.
Number of U.S. manufacturing establishments that produced chocolate and cocoa products in 2003. These establishments employed 43,379 people and shipped $12 billion worth of goods that year. California led the nation in the number of chocolate and cocoa manufacturing establishments, with 146, followed by Pennsylvania, with 120.
Number of U.S. establishments that manufactured nonchocolate confectionary products in 2003. These establishments employed 23,343 people and shipped $7 billion worth of goods that year. California also led the nation in this category, with 79 establishments.
25 pounds
Per capita consumption of candy by Americans in 2004; it is believed a large portion of this is consumed by kids around Halloween.
Number of formal wear and costume rental establishments across the nation in 2003.

Finally, the U.S. Census Bureau has some thoughts on where you might like to spend October 31:

Happy Halloween!

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