Unexpectedly Intriguing!
June 7, 2013

Now that we're on record as thinking that the stock market will be a pretty boring place for the foreseeable future (and yes, that includes days the Dow drops by 300 points or less), we're looking for other, more exciting and potentially high yielding things to consider as investments.

We thought about maybe investing in bonds, but bonds are even more boring and really, in these days of quantitative easing-depressed yields, we don't see much upside at this point. We also thought about buying and flipping houses, but we really don't want to be one of those people....

That's when it hit us! Rather than follow these more traditional investment paths, we decided that we should put our money to work in one of two ways, either to help blow something up or to rob banks.

We just haven't decided which to do yet....

Before we go any further, we should probably explain that what we're considering doing is contributing to one of two different Kickstarter projects.

For those who aren't familiar with Kickstarter, it is a social media site that is devoted to connecting creative people and inventors with people who might contribute funds toward realizing their proposed projects.

Here are the two projects that have caught our attention. The first is inventor Ryan Frayne's Windcatcher project, which features some unique inflator technology.

We think that anyone who has ever blown up a children's pool float or an air mattress will appreciate why this particular project has caught our attention.

Meanwhile, the second project we're considering is more of an artistic endeavor. Here, London-based designer Ilona Gaynor is planning an "extremely elaborate bank robbery", entitled "Under Black Carpets", which would involve the creation of sculptures, architectural models, technical drawings, films and photography depicting the simulated robbing of five major banks in downtown Los Angeles on a single day. The work is planned to be featured at the Lisbon Architecture Triennale later this year.

In a lot of ways, this project is similar to the various small film and movie projects that have been funded by Kickstarter, and we really like the idea of a museum exhibit dedicated to the execution of a crime, if only a fictional one. But then, we really liked the heist scenes in the remake of "The Thomas Crown Affair", so we might be somewhat biased....


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